Emerging Songbirds Celebrate Music and Fashion

After a year in lockdown, new singing talent is coming out of the woodwork. With singing competition shows and SoundCloud giving artists access to new platforms, it’s gotten just a little bit easier for young and independent talent to break through the crowd. Fashion Reverie has spotlighted some up-and-coming artists who we’ve deemed ones to watch.

Tamara Jade

You might know her from season 19 of NBC’s “The Voice,” but Tamara Jade was working long and hard to make a name for herself in music before ”The Voice.” Growing up in a musical family, she naturally honed her craft from singing in church to formal vocal training. Tamara has found her heart in the genres of gospel, r&b, soul, and jazz and is continuing to make a name for herself as an independent artist.

Fashion Reverie: How did you find your love of music?

Tamara Jade: I was born into a musical family, so music was just always around me. I grew up singing in church, too. I didn’t really have a choice when it came to music being a part of my life. No one ever forced me to do music, I just loved it. My mother is a singer and was our church music director, one brother is an organist and pianist, and my oldest brother is my manager, co-producer and co-writer, so [he] and I are actively working on music together all of the time.

THE VOICE — “Knockout Rounds” Episode 1909 — Pictured: Tamara Jade — (Photo by: Tyler Golden/NBC)

FR: I want to hear more about your educational background and how you started formally studying music.

Tamara Jade: My family did not just do music for fun. It was very serious to us. The whole attitude my family had was, if you’re going to do music, do it at the highest level, and the way to do that is to study.

I went to Suitland High School to their visual and performing arts magnet program. After that, I attended Oberlin Conservatory of Music and Oberlin College. I did the vocal performance program in the conservatory of music and I studied sociology in the college as a double degree student so I could explore my interests outside of music.

As soon as I graduated college, I booked the role of Mimi in Puccini’s “La Boheme” in Italy, but I wasn’t truly happy singing classical music. After that, I did a gospel tour for three months in Europe.

FR: What would you consider the turning point in your career?

Tamara Jade: When I worked with Lizzo for her MTV VMAs performance. Everything changed for me after that. I got to the audition, they gave us the dance routine to learn, and I never felt like something belonged to me more in my life. I made it clear to the casting directors I expect to get a phone call the next day. They called to book me the next day and told me I manifested this and they wanted someone that had the kind of power I have on board.

FR: You were cast on season 19 of “The Voice.” Why did you decide to go the reality TV competition route?

Tamara Jade: I was supposed to be touring with Cory Henry & the Funk Apostles, and we were supposed to open for Lenny Kravitz’s tour in Europe. While I was going through the process of auditioning for “The Voice,” I made it clear that if this show conflicting with the tour, I wasn’t doing it. Then COVID-19 cancelled the tour, so that potential conflict was out of the way.

This was actually my third time auditioning for the show. The producers reached out to me every time, they had wanted me on the show for a long time. Taping for season 19 kept getting pushed back because of COVID-19, but we made it happen, eventually.

FR: On “The Voice” you were coached by the legendary Mr. John Legend himself. Talk to me about that mentorship?

Tamara Jade: John Legend taught me so much exponentially in a short amount of time. From the moment I started working with John Legend, it was like we had known each other for years. There was immediate recognition of who we were outside of who everybody else was. One thing he said to me that they did not air was when he told me I have what church mothers called ‘the anointing.’ This man could look at me singing a Lizzo song and call me anointed. I was sold with him as a mentor from that moment.

THE VOICE — “Live Top 9 Performances” Episode 1913A — Pictured: Tamara Jade — (Photo by: Trae Patton/NBC)

FR: Now that you’ve come more into the public spotlight, have you worked to cultivate your fashion and style to build your image?

Tamara Jade: I hired a stylist. I had a vision in my head of what I wanted my fashion sense to be, but I didn’t have the time to go find clothes to create the image I wanted.

Working with a stylist has helped me learn the language of fashion, so that I could communicate my needs accurately to stylists.  

Fashion is an outward representation of who I am. Even if I’m wearing all black, I still want people to feel inspired when they see me, of course. I love mixing prints and patterns. I’ve learned what colors look good on my skin tone.

FR: Who do you want the world to see Tamara Jade as in ten years?

Tamara Jade: Love, light, and power.

Image courtesy of Ella Isaacson

Ella Isaacson

Ella Isaacson has become a major pop star to watch. The young starlet on the rise has over 40 million streams across multiple platforms and is being produced by Norwegian super producers Stargate, making her the first artist to be developed by the duo. She has a trained operatic voice. She might just be on the early leg of her journey, but make no mistake, she isn’t one to be underestimated.

FR: What inspired you to pursue music?

Ella Isaacson: I grew up in New York, and I was driven to start singing at a very young age. My father was an ENT (ear, nose, and throat) doctor, so he treated a lot of singers. I started classically training my voice at age 7. At 16, I was already taking lessons with major opera coaches.

I also had a natural love for writing and poetry. When I was in my teens, I had a cousin that was a music producer and musician. I begged him to help me record and start doing demos.

FR: You came from a more operatic background in terms of your music training. How did you make the transition from that to doing more pop and commercial music?

Ella Isaacson: My writing came from a place of being a lyricist, and I just loved pop music. When I was in the studio, I found that pop music came very naturally to me. That is what I was drawn to versus performing classical music professionally.

FR: You have over 40 million streams of your music. How do you think streaming has been beneficial to developing independent artists?

Ella Isaacson: It’s has become easier for artists to take more power into their own hands. Record labels have questions about what can work. If you have a voice or sound that’s different from what’s being pushed currently, record labels are afraid to take a risk on you.

I met with a lot of people, but there was the question from music executives about my sound being too different. I put my first song out on SoundCloud, and overnight it had 400,000 plays. There’s no guarantees in this industry; you just have to put the music out there and see what people feel.

Image courtesy of Bong Mines Entertainment

FR: How did you come to get produced by the duo Stargate? They are living legends who have produced lots of artists from Sam Smith to Rihanna.

Ella Isaacson: I had been releasing music online, and I came to a point where I felt a bit lost. Travelling and meeting new creators always make me feel inspired. I was living with a friend in England, and then I went to Sweden and got to meet other creators.

I went back to England and my friend I was staying with convinced me to go out for a drink. We went to a hotel bar, and in walked Stargate. My friend had worked for their publisher several years prior. She told Stargate I was a singer and they invited us to have breakfast the next morning. I felt like Stargate were the first people that really saw me for me. I really trusted them, and it was so natural.

FR: How would you describe your fashion style?

Ella Isaacson: My style is very classic and feminine. I love vintage pieces. Most of my wardrobe pieces are vintage, hand-me downs, or consignment. I love things that have a history. I’ll even redesign and alter old things myself so I can keep them longer.

I’m a big thrifter. I love the hunt. Sometimes you have these really beautiful pieces you come across and you can mix them with something more ‘90s or retro..

Zimmermann is one of my favorite designers, so they are one of the few brands I wouldn’t necessarily get on a vintage hunt, but aside from them I love vintage Chloé, Ralph Lauren, and Mugler. Mugler’s vintage cut is gorgeous from the shoulder pads to the cinched waists. I also love vintage Jean Paul Gaultier.  

Alice + Olivia is one of my favorite modern brands. One time I tagged the brand on Instagram and I got a personal message from the designer Stacey Bendet!

Image courtesy of Ella Isaacson

FR: What’s next for you?

Ella Isaacson: I have an EP I’m working on; we’re working on figuring out the release date.

—Kristopher Fraser

Speak Your Mind

*

Copyright © 2012-2021 | Fashion Reverie Publications, LLC - All Rights Reserved