Omar Wilson Is on his Way to Legendary Status in “Living Legend”

One thing that can be said of R&B artist Omar Wilson is that he is in love with life. And who wouldn’t be if you had been recently nominated for an NAACP Image Award and on tour with your highly acclaimed new album “Living Legend.”

Omar Wilson’s love of life is infectious. And even more attractive and charming is his soul-stirring vocal style. Reminiscent of Otis Redding mixed in with a little James Brown and Wilson Pickett for good measure, Omar Wilson conjures up these R&B greats while infusing his distinct qualities into his stage performances and recordings.

“This project [“Living Legend”] was a year in the making and I wanted to make certain that this album embodied organic truisms of music from the greats of yesterday, while keeping it real for the listeners of today. I wanted this album to showcase the remarkable vocal prowess that Omar is quite unique in delivering. “Living Legend” will stand the test of time,” says Lou Humphrey, CEO of BSE Recordings.

Never one to rest on his laurels, Omar Wilson keeps his eyes on the prize, the prize being R&B mega stardom with a legacy that can inspire others. Fashion Reverie thinks he is going to do it!!

Fashion Reverie: How would you describe your vocal style?

Omar Wilson: My vocal style is emotional, and intense, precise and above all, it is honest.

FR: You have a raspy quality to your voice which harkens back to some of the old school R&B singers of the 1960s and 70s. Is that raspy quality natural or have you worked to achieve that effect in your voice?

Omar Wilson: The raspy quality in my voice is a gift from God. I have had that quality since I was 16 or 17 years of age. My father’s voice is even bigger than mine and has a similar quality.

FR: Who are your musical influences?

Omar Wilson: Initially, I was inspired by the many things I was experiencing in life. So, if I heard music that was about what I was experiencing at that time, I would be inspired by that. After I had the experience of winning the Apollo Amateur contest, my musical influences started to change and evolve. The tutelage I got from winning at the Apollo caused me to research great singers that had left a legacy.

From this research, I discovered that there were great R&B singers from the past that sang about the same things I was feeling and experiencing. Some of these experiences and feeling were embedded in love songs. Before I started doing my research, I wasn’t that interested in love songs. But I found that R&B greats like Donny Hathaway, Sam Cooke, Al Green, Marvin Gaye, James Brown, and Otis Redding were singing about the things I was feeling, and they also had great voices.

I realized that I could sing about love but still maintain the intensity and power of my vocal style. I describe myself as a lion in a tuxedo.

FR: You are a three-time Apollo winner. What was it like singing on that iconic stage?

Omar Wilson: It was one of the most intense moments of my life because you are in an arena where the audience can tell you what they think about in the first 20 seconds of your act. Also, performing at the Apollo inspired me to acquire the soul music education so that I could begin to understand what my purpose was and where I stood in the music industry.

I was inspired to work hard and aspired to achieve what the great R&B legends like Marvin Gaye, Al Green, James Brown and others had achieved. The Apollo helped create living legends. And that greatness was made and is still alive at the Apollo. And I am honored to have performed there.

FR: What are the essential qualities that’s needed to be successful as an R&B artist that goes beyond talent and working hard?

Omar Wilson: Talent and hard work is important; however, a lot of talented artists work hard and get no where fast. You also need a team around you, and you especially need good fortune, or what I call, God’s favor.

You must be willing to go on a journey to get to where you want to go even when it doesn’t seem to be working out. But even, when it doesn’t seem to be working out, it is because you are growing and evolving. And you must be prepared for every opportunity.

You must believe God gave you the talent for a reason, and with his help you will exceed expectation. I have been working for almost two decades to get to where I am, and I believe this is my harvest season. And my new album “Living Legends” and my NAACP Image Award nomination speaks to that.

FR: I love the song “The Sh*t,” one of my favorites, how did that song come about?

Omar Wilson: “The Sh*t” was written by Mike City and myself in 2001. The song is about a young bougie girl who gets mixed up with the wrong crowd and ended up on the stroll. I recorded that song in LA with Mike City, and later I found out that Nate Dogg liked the song and did his own version of “The Sh*t.”

We are in the process of working out the legalities of “The Sh*t,” so that we can re-release it as a single.

FR: Let’s talk about your new album “Living Legend.” Why an album that conjures up some of the greatest soul singers of time?

Omar Wilson: This album has been a part of my journey. It is not something I just conjured up. The making of “Living Legend” was an organic evolution of everything I am becoming and paying homage to great R&B artists. I wanted to inject into this album the energy that is sometimes missing from R&B, and make goose bumps stand up on the neck of listeners. Right now, R&B is about moving audiences. It is more than singing well. Remember, the great R&B legends always moved folks.

FR: One of my favorites is the James Brown classic “It’s a Man’s World.” That said; we are living in the “Me Too Movement” generation, why did select that song as we are living in an era of women’s empowerment and calling out sexual aggression against women?

Omar Wilson: “It’s a Man’s World” was recorded almost fifty years before the “Me Too” Movement. When I was to perform the song on a few television shows, it was requested that I perform another track from the new album. I reminded the television networks that the lyrics of the song detailed that a man’s world would be nothing without a woman or a girl.

Anyway, I went through that storm with that song, but when I perform it and get to the line about women, the women in the audience go crazy. Women at my concerts understand that the song does not demean them, but that the song gives them equality and empowerment.

FR: How would you describe your personal fashion style?

Omar Wilson: I would describe my personal style as a kind of calm intensity. My call myself the ‘Black Sinatra.’ Back in the day Frank Sinatra had a great sense of style. He was smooth and moved like the Boss. Sinatra was buddy to the biggest gangsters of his day and to President John Kennedy. He was also was involved in the Civil Rights Movement.

Now, I may not be in a suit every time I am out and about, but even when I am dressed down, there is a sophistication and gentility about the way I have put myself together. There are a lot of great R&B singers on the market; however, there is no one with a 007 or “Ocean’s Eleven” style. I really do attempt to bring back that kind of style to R&B.

FR: Who are some of your favorite designers?

Omar Wilson: I just wore Calvin Klein to the NAACP Image Awards’ Brunch. I love Tom Ford, Fendi, Prada; hey if it looks good on you, it probably feels good on you.

Images courtesy of 2R Entertainment PR

FR: On your albums, you always have on a great jacket. Could you talk about your love of jackets”?

Omar Wilson: I always feel that when I guy puts on a great blazer, he is transformed. A great jacket or blazer gives a man a certain kind of sophistication that deems respect. A great blazer is just a part of wardrobe and reflects my personal style.

FR: What’s next for you?

Omar Wilson: I am currently on tour with my new album “Living Legend” which comes out on March 22. I am currently nominated for an NAACP Image Award for Outstanding New Artist. The sky is limit!!

—William S. Gooch

Comments

  1. Jean Renaud says

    What a great interview for a budding artist. I haven’t not seen this type of style in a long time. It’s dated but needed. The smoothness he speaks of will remind many people of just how cool it is to be an influencer in a positive light. It’s March 23rd and I got the album. It’s fire. 🔥.

    When do you start touring. Love to come and check these songs live.

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