Antonio Lopez 1970: Sex, Fashion & Disco

Image courtesy of departures.com

It is amazing how one person can touch the lives of so many people. Antonio Lopez is just that person. Though Lopez only lived to the ripe age of 44, his influence in the fashion industry is immensely important and still felt thirty years later.The documentary “Antonio Lopez 1970: Sex, Fashion & Disco” carefully and brilliantly details Antonio Lopez’s rise from humble beginnings in Puerto Rico, and later the Bronx, to his prolific, though short, career as a fashion illustrator and designer. Interestingly, Lopez’s ascent in the fashion industry—in the mid 1960s—came at time when there were few people of color in positions of influence. Still, Lopez with his magnetic charm was never an outsider, always pushing the proverbial fashion envelope, ultimately expanding fashion’s palette of what is beautiful and relevant.

Lopez, singlehandedly, used his familiarity with urban and street culture and infused his illustrations with that specific influence. This was perhaps the first time that major fashion publications had a person of color in their employ that paid homage to diversity and urban culture.

“Antonio Lopez 1970: Sex, Fashion & Disco” gives a purview into how the worlds of urban street culture, pop music, and the downtown arts scene were beginning to influence the fashion industry. Lopez was at the epicenter of this particular cross-pollination of cultures and infused his art and craft with this mélange of influences.

From his fashion illustrations that demonstrated that black and brown is beautiful to his renderings that expressed male sexuality and sensuality in ways that were both erotic and sophisticated, Lopez helped forge a new consciousness in fashion that went beyond the fashion elites and well-heeled ladies with deep pockets. And this documentary gives credence to Lopez’s mastery of fusing a plethora of pop cultural experiences.

Director James Crump carefully examines Lopez’s unique ability to excavate inchoate talent and pushing that talent to the forefront of fashion. Without Lopez there probably would not have been a Grace Jones, Pat Cleveland, Patti D’Arbanville, Corey Tippin or Jerry Hall. And it was Lopez and his partner Juan Ramos that sparked that creative fire and sensibility in Karl Lagerfeld early in his career. Without Lopez and his coterie of creative merry people, perhaps, Lagerfeld would not have developed into the genius who could masterfully combine a variety of influences and popular trends into a seamless expression of beauty and adventure.

Blending video footage, photographs, Lopez’s fashion illustrations, disco music and some very well-placed interviews from Jessica Lange, Grace Coddington, Bill Cunningham, Pat Cleveland, Joan Juliet Buck, Andre Leon Talley, Corey Tippin, Bob Colacello, and others, James Crump artfully creates the mood and motivation of the late 60s and 70s. This collision of cultures and aesthetics is set against the backdrop of New York City and Paris. In fact, Crump creates such well-collaged kaleidoscope of images, sounds and colors that is almost like being in the New York City and Paris of Antonio Lopez. Still, Crump does not leave out some of the vices that drove Lopez’s creative genius. Though these vices—sex, sex, and more sex—are not the focus of the documentary, Crump does detail Lopez’s excesses without simulating titillating voyeurism.

Sadly, like many artists of Lopez’s ilk, his glorious flame burned out way too early, succumbing to HIV/AIDS in 1987. Though Lopez is gone, he most certainly is not forgotten. And “Antonio Lopez 1970: Sex, Fashion & Disco” shows us why!!

“Antonio Lopez 1970: Sex, Fashion & Disco” is currently playing at the IFC Center in New York City through October 4.

—William S. Gooch

Speak Your Mind

*

Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterCheck Our FeedVisit Us On Pinterest
Copyright © 2012-2018 | Fashion Reverie Publications, LLC - All Rights Reserved