Boom For Real: The Late Teenage Years of Jean-Michel Basquiat

The fashion industry is experiencing a retrospective glance back at 1980s street style and culture. This nostalgic reverie, if you call it that, plays out mostly in an reinterpretation of 80s street style evidenced in re-imaged track suits, big hoop earrings, an explosion of 80s–inspired sneakers, fanny packs, and a reinvention of glammed-up New Jack and Jill Swing.

Prior to urban culture becoming a part of the mainstream there were forces in play that gave seed and flower to a political and cultural movement that was the direct antithesis to white privilege. Jean-Michel Basquiat was at the epicenter of this shifting tide, putting his on stamp on the art world and what was to become hip-hop culture. Though his life was cut short by drugs and excessiveness, Basquiat’s impact on the art world urban culture is still felt thirty years after his untimely death. “Boom For Real: The Late Teenage Years of Jean-Michel Basquiat” successfully examines Basquiat’s burgeoning talent before he took the art world by storm and New York City as the backdrop to Basquiat’s genius.

                                            Image courtesy of okplayer.com

As a 16-year old homeless youth Jean-Michel Basquiat’s New York City was a city that had been ripped apart by urban decay and blight and financial insecurity. White flight and the financial crisis of the late 1970s had left New York City bankrupt with few resources to buffer the growing tensions bubbling under the surface. Yet, this lack of resources served as a creative petri dish for a growing urban culture and style that would include rap music, changing fashion trends, and a new direction in art. Director Sara Driver brilliantly juxtaposing New York City’s declining infrastructure as an inspiring landscape for Basquiat’s nascent brilliance.

Images of Fab Five Freddy, Jim Jarmusch, and Lee Quinones courtesy of Magnolia Pictures

Starting with Basquiat’s minor dalliance into graffiti art with the street tag SAMO, Driver’s “Boom For Real” follows Basquiat’s evolution from a talented street teen to a young artist who combines mixed media to take the art world by storm in the early 80s. Driver ingeniously weaves in interviews from friends and collaborative artists like Fab Five Freddy, Jim Jarmusch, Patricia Fields, Lee Quinones, Luc Sante, and others to paint, almost figuratively, a portrait of who Basquiat was and who he was going to become. Driver also brilliantly distilled how Basquiat moved between the worlds of urban culture, the downtown art and culture scenes, expertly absorbing and manipulating those worlds to his own best advantage. On the surface from this documentary, Driver almost concedes that Basquiat was an operator and hustler; yet, Basquiat exposed the insincere privileged art world of that time, where some artists were “making art on their parent’s dime.” Basquiat would have none of that, mainly because he was not that privileged. What he did do was demonstrate that there was relevance and beauty—though sometimes dystopian in nature—to what was going on in urban young people of color’s mind and experiences and that the larger world should take notice. Pat Fields, who carried some of Basquiat’s one-of-a-kind clothing in her store, said it best, “He came to conclusions based on his own philosophies. Most people just aimlessly walk around.”Basquiat represented the artist as an alienated, disenfranchised youth that had a strong point of view, making art based on their own terms. And the rest of the world be damned. This in your face, almost anachronistic approach to his art made Basquiat in odd character, but interesting to folks in NYC’s downtown culture scene. And once his art got the right focus and venue, it just took off.As one interview subject expanded toward the end of the documentary, “He did it. He gave it to them his way. He showed it’s possible!!””Boom For Real: The Late Teenage Years of Jean-Michel Basquiat” is currently playing at the IFC Theater in NYC until May 23.

—William S. Gooch

Ballet Hispánico Scores Another Homerun

                     Image courtesy of Paula Lobo

A few years back, Ballet Hispánico hosted an audience Q&A after one of their performances, and an audience member commented that he was surprised that Ballet Hispánico did not present more ballets with a stronger Latin influence. Perhaps, this audience member thought he was only going to see flamenco dance or dance works with strong, traditional Latin rhythms from the Caribbean and South America. What that audience member may not have understood is that Latin culture is an amalgam of influences from many cultures, be it West Africa, North Africa, indigenous Native cultures, the European mainland, and even some Asian and Middle Eastern cultures. And oftentimes these cultural influences are so brilliantly melded into more recognizable Latin rhythms and influences that to the untrained eye, some theatrical works may not appear Hispanic, when in fact, the Latin presence is quite strong.

At their recent season at the Joyce Theater, Ballet Hispánico’s CEO and Artistic Director Eduardo Vilaro demonstrated the breadth and wealth of the Latin diaspora. The four programs on the opening performance—Linea Recta, Espiritus Gemelos, Waiting for Pepe, and Con Brazos Abiertos—aptly exhibit that Ballet Hispánico is commented to exploring Latin culture in all its diversity and incarnations.

Under founder Tina Ramirez, Ballet Hispánico assembled a repertoire that had a recognizable Latin influence and fit into the fold of what non-Hispanic audiences would expect from a dance company rooted in Latin culture. Ramirez’s point of view under her aegis was appropriate at that time. However, in this current incarnation of Ballet Hispánico, Vilaro is stretching the company beyond that. And that is a real good thing.

                                    “Linea Recta” image courtesy of Paula Lobo

Annabelle Lopez Ochoa’s Linea Recta approaches familiar, traditional Hispanic influences—flamenco, mantillas, lacy, ruffled dresses, and black fans—in a modern interpretation. Ochoa aptly takes familiar flamenco movement and replaces and enhances some recognizable movement with vocabulary from the modern dance lexicon. Instead of flamenco foot tapping, Ochoa employs barefoot shuffles and other barefooted flourishes. The traditional high-low ruffled skirt, traje de gitana, is replaced by a shortened version that gives the dancers more movement freedom. And the pyrotechnically brilliant choreography demonstrates Ochoa’s acumen for taking something that is deeply rooted in Andalusian culture and translates that influence into a modern interpretation for modern audiences. The company performed this seminal favorite with verve, passion, and technical prowess with standout performances by Chris Bloom, Lyvan Verdecia, and Eila Valls.

     “Waiting for Pepe” image courtesy of Paula Lobo

“Waiting for Pepe,” a Ballet Hispánico world premiere with choreography by Carlos Pons Guerra, explores Guerra’s interpretation of Federico Garcia Lorca’s play The House of Bernarda Alba. For those familiar with Lorca’s play, the dominance of the women in the household is front and center. That female forcefulness is a crucial element in Guerra’s choreography. Guerra infuses his Latin power women and family intrigue with the theatricality that can be found in Latin films and telenovelas.

Guerra also showcases in “Waiting for Pepe” his ability to meld different movement styles from the modern dance lexicon seamlessly without sacrificing dramatic relevance. And the last movement of this dance work Guerra brilliantly utilized the rhythmic, percussive music of Jacinto Guerrero, exhibiting Guerro’s expert skill at expressing modern dance movement styles juxtaposed against narrative and emotion.

Ballet Hispánico’s Joyce season placed a heavy emphasis on Federico Garcia Lorca. The company’s third work of their opening night was the second dance work that drew inspiration from Lorca. “Espiritus Gemelos,” another company world premiere, drew inspiration from the meeting between Lorca and Salvador Dali in 1923. Collected letters from that time imply that they there may have been a sexual relationship between Lorca and Dali. Gustavo Ramirez Sansano explores this relationship through movement that is subtle, thoughtful, and sensual. Again, Ballet Hispánico explores different ways of defining Latin culture through movement that expands the company’s repertoire beyond work and movement styles that is familiar and expected.

                          “Con Brazos Abiertos” image courtesy of Paula Lobo

Another favorite, Michelle Manzanales’ “Con Brazos Abiertos,” explores the immigrant experience with verbal sound tracks from Cheech and Chong, music of Julio Iglesias, and a mix of rock en epanol. Funny, bombastic, and technically brilliant, this crowd favorite always satisfies.

Ballet Hispánico’s season at the Joyce Theater is from April 10–15.

—William S. Gooch

Blockers: An Adult and Teenage Sex Comedy for the 21st Century

Anyone familiar with the teenage sex comedies of the 1980s understands that most of the 80s teen sex comedies—The Last American Virgin, Porky’s, Fast Times at Ridgemont High, Private Lessons, and Little Darlings—where about getting laid or dealing with the virginity obstacle. It was formulaic, frequently low budget, oftentimes archetypal, depending on your age, very entertaining, and box-office gold until market saturation crept in.

Blockers seeks to take advantage of the continued teenage angst of what to do about unwanted sexual inexperience as seen through the eyes of three female senior high friends who make a pact to get rid of their virginity on prom night. What does differ in the 2018 version of formulaic teen sex movies is that the main characters in Blockers are the parents not the teenagers.

Parents sentimental super jock John Cena, overprotective Leslie Mann, and liberal, chilled out Ike Barinholtz form a posse to prevent, or ‘cock block’ their gal pal daughters from losing their virginity on senior prom night after discovering a text message on Mann’s daughter’s Katherine Newton’s laptop. Teaming up all three parents go through a series of high jinks, guffaws, and realizations has they attempt to foil the gal pal pact.

Though Blockers does differ from 80s teen sex comedies of its ilk, there are some obvious archetypes and story lines. There is the nerdy character that has a horny flip side. In this case it’s Cena’s daughter played by Geraldine Viswanathan. There is also the constant drinking and drunken stupors always found in 80s teen sex films. Lastly, there has to be one anal sex reference. (John Cena is comedy gold in this scene.) And there is the awkwardness of first-time intercourse similarly found in 80s teen flicks. Which is surprising with the current expanded liberal attitudes toward sex and sexual orientation.

Still, there are some differences from 80s teen sex comedies. Family composition in Blockers includes mixed marriages and relationships. We also witness kinky sexual games, not by teens, but from the adults. There is the deciphering of emojis and teenage guys with man buns. The introduction of same sex coupling is not so new, but the general liberal attitude toward gayness is.Blockers is not a movie to look to great screen performances, but teen sex comedies rarely are. However, but as an escape vehicle Blockers might just do the trick. And in these very uncertain times where absurdity is the order of the day and the emperor has no clothes, escape is a very good thing!!

                                            Images courtesy of Universal Studios

Blockers cast includes Leslie Mann, John Cena, Ike Barinholtz, Katherine Newton, Geraldine Viswanathan, and Gideon Adlon, and is directed by Kay Cannon. Blockers opens nationwide on April 6.

—William S. Gooch

Jesus Christ Superstar on the Goth Side

Graduation Backdrops

                                                   Image courtesy of newsweek.com

Translating a musical from the Broadway stage to film is a difficult task, and the transfers rarely do justice to the original production. In recent years there have been some success to some critical acclaim and with modest returns at the box office. Dreamgirls, Chicago, and Hairspray come to mind.Even more of an arduous task is performing Broadway musicals live for a television audience. For the past few years NBC has tried its hands at this very ambitious endeavor, with not a lot of success—The Wiz being the network’s most calamitous faux pas. Still, NBC soldiers on in spite of not being able to deliver credible re-interpretations of Broadway classics repurposed for television.

                                                  Image courtesy of NPR.org

Jesus Christ Superstar is NBC’s latest blunder. Though the televised production has a noteworthy cast, the production value and main character performances fall way below what the iconic Broadway classic aptly deserves.When Jesus Christ Superstar debuted in London and on Broadway in the early 1970s, the now-iconic musical was a revolutionary approach to presenting the historical Jesus in a more contemporary and humanistic way. No longer was Jesus only a heavenly, divine God figure who performed miracles and was to be the divine Messiah of all of mankind, Sir Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice’s Jesus was a relatable God-like prophet who spoke words of wisdom, love, and rebellion. All this set against the backdrop of folksy, lyrical songs and rock n’ roll recitatives that helped push the story forward of Jesus’ last week before his crucifixion.

                                         Image courtesy of thewrap.com

Though this Jesus rock opera received lots of criticism at the time of its premiere, the rock opera was a huge hit among young theatergoers and received well-deserved popularity among followers of the Jesus movement that was sweeping the US in the late 60s and early 70s. And though there have been many reincarnations and reinventions of the classic rock opera over the last 40 years, Jesus Christ Superstar is still able to move audiences because of the incredible Andrew Lloyd Webber and Time Rice score.Well, maybe not this time around. That said; the producers of this televised version of Jesus Christ Superstar did do some things right. Surrounding a not tried-by-Broadway fire main character with strong Broadway performers was a very good choice. Brandon Victor Dixon as Judas Iscariot, Norm Lewis as Caiaphas, and Erik Gronwall as Simon Zealot gave much support to John Legend (Jesus Christ)—in spite of being in strong voice—whose lack of charisma and stagecraft did not convince as  Jesus Christ.

Backdrop party photography pictures

   Images courtesy of IBTtimes.com, fashionista.com, and gettyimages.com, respectively

Paul Tazewell stage costumes also worked in this production; well, sometimes. While Jacquemus dress served Sara Bareilles’ Mary Magdalgene well, the Issey Miyake geometric coats worked for the Sanhedrin, and Anne Demeulemeester’s punked-out, white layered, monkish robes also made sense for the priests, the Rick Owens’ looks for the disciples and Jesus Christ (Balmain white moto jeans and Rick Owens’ torn tee shirt) made Jesus and his disciplines look like underground rebels from some dystopian society. We know that historically, Jesus and his disciples, with the exception of the zealot Judas Iscariot, were not outsiders in their community, but an integral part of the formative Judaic community at that time. Still, Jesus and his disciplines looking like grunge, goth moles is hard to digest.Still, Tazewell gets a pass in favor of artistic license. However, the Conan the Destroyer set does not get a pass. Many of the songs and rock recitatives speak of the light and love of Jesus Christ; however, the set and the costumes detail the darkness and gloom of those times, perhaps, referencing the Roman occupation of Palestine. This incongruence does not help push the story forward and the Beatles’ like screams from audience members every time John Legend opened his month distracted from the production.

https://www.katebackdrop.com/collections/easter-backdrops

JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR LIVE IN CONCERT — Pictured: Brandon Victor Dixon as Judas — (Photo by: Virginia Sherwood/NBC)

Overall, this was by far the better of NBC’s Broadway musical productions. Perhaps, this signifies some light at the end of the tunnel!!—William S. Gooch

If You Love Costume Dramas and Fashion, Binge Away

It’s winter. You’re pockets are empty from the holiday season. It’s dark when you leave for work and when you get home.  On weekends, you don’t want to go out because it’s wet and cold.  Oh what could drag you out of this cloud of Weltschmerz?

Brew yourself a cup of hot tea and plant yourself on the couch with the cat. You have shows with amazing fashions to binge on! Stay hydrated, and don’t forget to take occasional breaks to stretch.

                                            Image courtesy of Netflix

The Crown – Seasons 1 & 2 Available on NetflixSettle in for this sumptuous tale of The House of Windsor that will leave you scrambling for Google and Pinterest. Claire Foy earned an Outstanding Performance SAG award for her uncanny portrait of Queen Elizabeth II. The costuming on the show really tells a story about each character. Vanessa Kirby is the breakout star playing Princess Margaret, a woman for the modern age frequently dressed in pants at a time when some considered it scandalous. Compare that to Queen Elizabeth’s matronly frocks, despite having access to untold wealth and the pick of all the couture design houses of the day. The scene in which Elizabeth is happy to find her signature hairstyle at age 32—that she wears to this day at age 91—is almost cringe-worthy for how deeply the unflattering cut ages her. And that’s before all the family drama! Spoiler alert there are a shocking number of Nazis scuttling among the outermost branches of the family tree.

                                                     Image courtesy of HBO

Big Little Lies – Season 1 Available on HBOSet among the moneyed class in Monterey, CA, this five-episode drama cleaned up at the SAG Awards and the Golden Globes. The mysterious whodunit was supposed to be a limited series but popular demand has created a second season—unfortunately it’s unlikely to be seen before 2019. Even if you’ve already seen the show, this is a great time to revisit the series and take notice of how all the amazing outfits are perfectly calculated for each character from Celeste’s elegant yet comfortable sweaters—chosen for a secret reason̶ to Madeline’s (Witherspoon) refusing to take off her overpriced pumps while dropping off her children at school even after rolling her ankle.

                                                 Image courtesy of TV Land

Younger – Season 1– 4 available on HuluSutton Foster stars as a member of the “opt out” generation stunned to find herself divorced and broke at 40. Desperate for work she reinvents herself as a 20- something in the publishing industry. This is a sweet funny tale of female friendship and solidarity. While publishing exec Diane Trout, portrayed by Miriam Shor, can afford designer outfits—and LIVES for bulky statement jewelry̶—the rest of the cast sports fashionable but affordable clothes you’d see at Zara and high-end accessories that looked plucked from sample sales. The show is surprisingly realistic about New York housing, considering it was created by Darren Starr of “Sex and the City” fame. Liza (Foster) lives with Maggie (Debi Mazar) in a gigantic 2 bedroom Williamsburg loft, but we find out she purchased it in the late 80’s when it was in a ‘bad’ part of town. Co-worker Kelsey (played by Hillary Duff) lives with college friend Lauren in Lauren’s parents apt for free because “how else could we afford to live in Manhattan?”.

                                                Image courtesy of The Atlantic

Marvelous Mrs. Maisel – season 1 available on Amazon PrimeCreated by Amy Sherman Palladino and husband Dan Palladino, “Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” tells a story of accidental feminism during the 1950’s with the help of huge budget and a lot of insight into how clothes can make the woman.    Rachel Brosnahan won a Golden Globe playing Miriam (aka Midge) Maisel is delighted with her Upper West Side life caring for her two children and supporting her accountant husband’s desperate effort to be a stand-up comic, dressing to perfection, and making sure Joel never sees her without makeup. Except husband Joel’s routine is stolen from Bob Newhart and he’s having an affair with his dumb as rocks secretary Penny Pann (that is one of the series’ few missteps as Penny is a brain dead slut with a ridiculous name. Come on!) When he walks out that’s when Midge realizes in a drunken haze she’s the true comic in the family. Gaslight café staffer Susie recognizes her talent and decides to become her manager.

Most tales of feminism come from women rallying against their restrictive roles; however, by stark contrast Midge LOVES her role. She only gets a job and starts developing her comedy because she is forced to by circumstance. We can see her evolution in fashion from her perfectly put together outfits that require so much effort to donning pants and flat shoes for comfort and practicality. Susie, played by Alex Borstein, lives in shapeless pants, bulky sweater and an ever-present men’s hat, frequently mistaken for a man. Come for the fashions, stay for this warm funny tale of friendship, liberation, and show business.

         Image courtesy of cravetv.com

Sex and The City – Seasons 1–6 on HBOWhat can be said about HBO’s groundbreaking comedy series that heralded a new era of television? Well for one thing, the stories about friendship and romance have held up remarkably well. It’s amazing to watch the characters grow as the series evolves and fascinating to see how each character expresses their emotions and creativity through fashion. You can even see how New York City and the world have changed. Except for Miranda, none of the women have cellphones. There is no social media—you know Samantha Jones would have been all over Instagram. It’s shocking to see Carrie smoking in bars. You know you still miss this show. Visit it again!!

—Cameron Grey Rose

 

 

Interview Exclusive: Arden Myrin Expands her Character Repertoire in “HeadShop”

                                           Image courtesy of amazon.com

A good thing is happening in Hollywood. No longer do actresses have to be pigeonholed into one type of character for the entirety on their film career. (You know those stereotypical roles; romantic lead, ingénue, quirky best friend, working girl, comic relief, vamp, foil, hard-working mom, psychopath, tragic mulatto.) In this new version of Hollywood, actresses can move more easily through a variety of characters, being deeply conflicted and dramatic on one hand or top banana on the other. And for some actresses, especially if they have that facility, the days of being confined to one type of acting genre is over and the sky is the limit.

Arden Myrin is one of the new breed of actresses who is breaking the typecast mold. Known primarily for her comedy skits on “MadTV” and “Chelsea Lately,” Arden Myrin has had film roles in”Kinsey,” “Christmas with the Kranks,” “The Imformant!,” and “Wrong Cops,” just to name a few. And some of her strong performances demonstrate her versatility in comedy, as well as dramatic roles.

With her star still rising with a starring role in a new Netflix series and the soon to be released “HeadShop,” Arden took the time to speak with Fashion Reverie about her craft, her love affair with standup, and her passion for creating characters.

                 Images courtesy of celebmafia.com and wikipedia.com, respectively

Fashion Reverie: Arden is an interesting name, where does it come from and how did your parents pick that name?

Arden Myrin: My mom grew up in Queens, NY and went to Bayside High and I am named after my mom and my last name is some weird Swedish Viking derivation.

FR: You became involved in theater and acting as a young child. Where did this love of theater and creating characters come from? 

Arden Myrin: I grew up in a tiny town in Rhode Island. There is still mostly just a general store and no stoplights. My parents had moved from New York City to this small town and every year my mom would take me to NYC. One year I saw “Annie,” and that was it for me. I was a redheaded kid and I just knew I could play Annie. My parents even recorded “Saturday Night Live” for me and I would watch and not understand some of the adult humor.

So, I just grew up in this country town and I couldn’t wait to be an adult. All we had was old movies on TV, so I believed that when I grew up I would be a Judy Holliday or Myrna Loy character.

FR: Do you think growing up in a small town fed into you’re desire to act and create characters?

Arden Myrin: My mom kind of strategically left NYC because she wanted her children to be able to create their own fun and their own magic. I think when there is a lack of constant stimulation you can be forced to use your imagination more. There is a beauty in growing up in a simple place that spurs creativity. I wanted to razzle dazzle, and there was no razzle dazzle in my home town. I wanted to be like Gypsy Rose Lee with sequins and feathers, anything other than the corduroys I saw every day.

                       Image courtesy of pinterest

FR: You really got your start in this industry as a member of the famous Groundlings and doing standup. Why comedy as a starting point?

Arden Myrin: I always loved Gilda Radner, Teri Garr, and Madeline Kahn. I just knew that if I didn’t go to Yale or Juilliard I needed some way to get on stage to show what I could do to get an agent. And I was always a kind of silly girl. I knew I could write something to help get me an agent.

I like making people laugh and I come from a very funny family. If you can brighten someone’s day with laughter than you have accomplished something good.

FR: You obviously love stand-up because you’ve been doing it for some time now. Why do you keep coming back to standup? 

Arden Myrin: That’s an interesting question because standup terrifies me. You know there are not that many women who tour as standup headliners.

In this political climate we feel that the country is so divided; however, when you tour you get to know people in a way that you never would. And people who may have different political views don’t seem so strange and odd. It is a humbling experience to be welcomed in a town or city and share an experience with people who on the surface seem so different.

FR: You have done stage, screen, television, and stand-up. Which platform do you prefer, and why?

Arden Myrin: If I had to pick one, I like television the most because you can tell a story and develop a character over several episodes. Still, there is a thrill of doing live theater every night.

                             Image courtesy of “Chelsea Lately”

FR: Could you talk a little bit about appearing over 100 times on “Chelsea Lately”?

Arden Myrin: That show was so much fun, as well as a little frightening. You are flying solo on “Chelsea Lately” because you never did retakes. It was always fun because you so much wanted to do a good job. The audience would let you know if they got your jokes or not, and you were also on the show with really good comedians.

I was so grateful to be a part of that show and watch Chelsea build her whole brand and image. She is such a hard worker. You know, she was writing all those books in the middle of doing five shows a week. She would also fly all over the country on the weekends and do stand-up, as well as promote her books. She worked her ass off, and built that whole machine.

FR: How did being cast in “HeadShop” come about?

Arden Myrin: It was really a magical present. It was offered to me and I wish all my roles appeared so magically. I didn’t have to audition; my manager represented a couple of people who were cast (Evan Ross and Nicole Ari Parker). From beginning to end it was a great joy. I loved working with the writer/director Kim Bass.

                                              Images courtesy of “HeadShop”

FR: Could you talk a little bit about your character Shelby in “HeadShop”?

Arden Myrin: Shelby is a sweet, newly divorced trophy wife who was married to a much older, wealthy man. She acquired a huge settlement from her divorce and now doesn’t know what to do with time and all this money. She has been seeing a therapist (played by Nicole Ari Parker) in San Francisco and has become obsessed with her. Shelby thinks her therapist is her best friend although she pays her.

FR: Without giving too much away, what do you think viewers will get from and like about “HeadShop”?

Arden Myrin: Audiences will find the movie funny, and that there is a lot of wit to it as well. The film celebrates community which is one of the themes of the film. The film speaks to gentrification, community, love and finding that place of acceptance.

FR: Fashion Reverie is a fashion magazine; that said, who are your favorite designers?

Arden Myrin: I recently have fallen in love with the YSL mini dress. I have been stalking online trying to buy vintage ones. When I come to NYC, I love going to the store ATT. They have such great clothes, they have Self Portrait, a brand I love.

FR: Which designers would you like to wear that you haven’t already worn?

Arden Myrin: That is an interesting question. I love ethereal clothes that make you feel like you are playing dress up. I am not afraid of a little whimsy. I would love to wear Chanel, Louis Vuitton, Rodarte, and Miu Miu.

                    Blake Patterson and Arden Myrin image courtesy of “HeadShop”

FR: Lets talk about the Blake Patterson clothes you are wearing in “HeadShop.”

Arden Myrin: Nicole Ari Parker’s therapist character moves her San Francisco practice to Oakland. I trail behind her to continue working with her as my therapist. So her I am driving across the Golden Gate Bridge in my white Bentley to Oakland because I am obsessed with this therapist. Now mind you, I am the only one from her practice in San Francisco who follows her to Oakland.

Next door to her office in Oakland is fashion store called the Nubian Queen run by Evan Ross’s character. The clothes are the beautiful African inspired-clothing made with the most luxurious African fabrics. I am like Malibu Barbie who has just found her design aesthetic in these unbelievable garments. I buy almost everything in the store from head wraps to you name it. It’s like I have found my true self. I become so obsessed with the clothing that I start to fund his clothing line.

Blake Patterson designed all these garments for me. Now, Blake is this small white guy from Ohio and it was a surprise to me that he was going to create all these incredible garments for me. The clothes are so magical and he made them all in one week. He went to an African fabric store and bought the fabric. He played with the different shapes and silhouettes. I got to wear one exquisite garment that was like a jumpsuit with a huge ruffle down one side.

Now, when Blake Patterson made the garments in the film, he didn’t know I was cast in the role. At any rate, the garments fit like a glove. The clothes are so beautiful and joyful and I got to wear maybe five or six of these incredible garments in the film. It was the most beautiful wardrobe I have ever worn in a film.FR: What’s next for you?

Arden Myrin: I am in a new Netflix show. It is called “Insatiable,” and it’s about beauty pageants and murder, and I play a bad character. I am like Reese Witherspoon in “Legally Blond,” but I act like Reese in “Election.” I am all deception and duplicity. My character is Regina Sinclair and I am all southern charm, but evil. By the way, “Insatiable” is filmed in Atlanta. I am ruthless and wound tight. Alyssa Milano is also in the cast.

—William S. Gooch

 

 

The Evolution of Ballet Hispanico

                                 “Bury Me Standing” image courtesy of Paula Lobo

Tina Ramirez founded Ballet Hispanico in 1970 to give Latin choreographers, dancers and the Latin community at large a place to hone their craft and give voice to the Latin experience in the new and old world. Where under Tina Ramirez’s leadership Ballet Hispanico evolved into dance company that is recognized internationally and attracts some of the most talented Latin global artists, Ramirez put lots of emphasis on recognizable Latin movement styles from flamenco, indigenous Hispanic folkloric dances and dance styles that form the diasporic bridge between the old world and the new.Under Eduardo Vilario aegis Ballet Hispanico is presenting a much larger embrace of the Hispanic diaspora, seen through the lens of ever-evolving movement styles, accurately expressing this larger embrace to modern audiences. Ballet Hispanico’s short season at the Apollo Theater wholly demonstrates this evolution. Vilario recognizes that Latin culture is no longer ‘the other’ or the exotic; it is the here and now.

This modern perspective is made all the more evident in the musical choices found in the company’s current repertoire. In most dance companies the choreography and the performance level of the dancers is front and center and the main attraction; however, in this outing the music is the driving force behind the ballets with the dancers serving as supportive component to the music. This is not only an evolution for Ballet Hispanico, it is also a good thing. And a manifestation that perhaps the dance world is moving beyond personality-driven artists that drive box office—consider the dance phenomenon of Nureyev and Fonteyn in the 1960s; Baryshnikov, Jamison, and Kirkland in the 1970s, and other dance stars in the 80s and 90s— and moving toward a more integrated approach where all elements that make a performance possible are equally important.

                                 “Espiritu Vivo” images courtesy of Paula Lobo

The ballet on the program seen at the Apollo Theater that best expressed this evolution of Latin movement styles is Ron Brown’s “Espiritu Vivo.” Brown has established an oeuvre for creating ballets that infuse popular dance styles into choreography that is also steeped in more codified movement disciplines. This melding of dance forms is an integral part of Brown’s “Espiritu Vivo.”Originally made for Ballet Hispanico in 2012, after a five-year absence, gratefully this fully realized work is back in the company’s repertoire. And it is currently danced with passion and soulful vibrancy. Exploring the intersection of African and Latino diasporas, Brown seamlessly melds Horton, Graham, and Dunham techniques with dance styles that come out of Santeria, later becoming more recognizable Latin Caribbean cultural dance styles.

“Espiritu Vivo” opens with an almost monastic restraint and builds toward ecstatic exuberance. For those lucky enough to translate the Susana Baca’s music used in this work, the messages of bondage juxtaposed against the liberating spirit of freedom as seen against the African and Latino diasporas comes across loud and clear. Standout dancers in “Espiritu Vivo” include Lyvan Verdecia, whose movement quality was grounded and fully invested, and newcomer Garbrielle Sprave, whose majestic presence filled the stage.

                             “Bury Me Standing” images courtesy of Paula Lobo

With Ramon Oller’s “Bury Me Standing,” Ballet Hispanico looked almost like a completely different company. Though this ballet is over 20 years old, Ballet Hispanico performed the work as though it was made brand new on the company.The ever-evolving Ballet Hispanico is demonstrating every season that they can handle almost any movement style and a variety of movement styles in one work. In “Bury Me Standing,” Oller not only used a wealth of movement styles but also ingeniously incorporated mime and words for dramatic effect in reference to the alien status of gypsies and the Roma people. Oller’s use of the innovative ‘airplane’ partnering really gives this work a signature look. Standout dancers include Diana Winfree and Nick Fearon.

                                “Con Brazos Abiertos” image courtesy of Paula Lobo

Creative director Eduardo Vilario brought back Michelle Manzanales’ “Con Brazos Abiertos” from the company’s 2017 season at the Joyce Theater earlier in the year. This hilarious and thought-provoking exploration of the Mexican-American experience in the US melds folkloric details with canned dialogue from Cheech and Chong and the music of Selena and Julio Iglesias.Like all the works in this season at the Apollo Theatre, “Con Brazos Abiertos” demonstrates that Latin American culture is not an addition to the American mainstream, Latin American culture is an integral part of the mainstream. Viva Ballet Hispanico.

—William S. Gooch

Nicole Ari Parker Discusses Life, Career Choices and “HeadShop”

                                                  Image courtesy of Kim Bass

Getting and maintaining traction in the fashion industry is a circuitous journey that takes talent, perseverance, hard work, providence, and nerves of steel. Acting has similar requirements. And success and good fortune have eluded talented thespians who would have become household names if only the fickle of fingers of fate were pointed in their direction.Nicole Ari Parker is one of those fortunate actors who has been blessed by providence. Well known for her role in the Showtime series “Soul Food,” Nicole Ari Parker for the past two decades has successfully portrayed characters that run the gamut of emotion, sensitivity, humor, and pathos.

Equally known for her roles in television, as well as film, Nicole Ari Parker continues to hit her stride in the upcoming independent film “HeadShop.” Conceived and directed by Kim Bass, “HeadShop” examines issues of gentrification, class, cultural appropriation, and community.

Scheduled for release in early 2018, Nicole Ari Parker chatted with Fashion Reverie about her love of acting, her career trajectory, and her role in “HeadShop.”

                                              Image courtesy of Kim Bass

Fashion Reverie: Now you started out as a ballet dancer, why the shift to acting?Nicole Ari Parker: Well, I studied ballet mostly as a kid and I was more serious about becoming a classically trained actress. My mom had me involved in lots of things as a child, and theatre and acting kind of stood out over the other creative pursuits.

FR: Where did this love of acting come from? 

Nicole Ari Parker: I was just full of drama as a kid. I am an only child and I had a vivid imagination and read a lot of books. I would turn the stories I read in books into plays. I would also write my own plays and produce them. I just had a natural affinity for the stage; it is truly my first love.

I am from Baltimore and my parents had sacrificed so much to put me through private school that lead me to going to New York University (NYU) a year early at the age of 17. I went to NYU as an English and drama major that I thought would be more stable than majoring in theatre. I wanted to do something that would make my parents proud of me.

In my second semester I auditioned for the Tisch School of the Arts—that is a part of NYU—and I called my Dad and asked him if I could change majors. He said if I did, I had to be diligent and not give up. So, here I am!!

FR: Your range as an actress is phenomenal from “Boogie Nights” to “Subway Stories” to “Soul Food’ to “Brown” Sugar,” and “200 Cigarettes” to “Almost Christmas.” The depth and width of your roles have gone from comedy to drama, and back again. That said; what do like best comedy or dramatic roles?

Nicole Ari Parker: The older I get, the funnier I have become. Life teaches you so much. My heart is always on the stage and with more dramatic roles. There is a whole world of opportunity out there to tell more stories, and we need more people of color writing those stores (both funny and serious), so that there is more range and a diversity of voices.

                                           “Headshop” cast images courtesy of shadowandact.com

FR: You have done a lot of big studios films and well as independent films, what do you like best, independent or big studio?

Nicole Ari Parker: I like work that is more character driven whether it is from a big studio or it is independent film. I jumped at the change to work on the character I play in Kim Bass’ “HeadShop” when the role fell in my lap.

FR: Why did “HeadShop” excite you?

Nicole Ari Parker: Kim is a visionary and that is a rare opportunity in this industry to work with someone who is a visionary. When you are creative person in this industry, you have to take a lot of jobs to pay the bills that don’t challenge you as an artist. You have to take guest starring roles in television and other mediums that are not always challenging.

I have played some sort of executive on television now for over ten years. You get pigeon holed and then you get a script that is just beautiful on the page and saturated with color and nuance and all the sensibilities that excites you as a creative person. Add to that, Kim Bass, a director of color, and “HeadShop” as a film is a dream come true.

FR: Without giving too much away, could you talk about your character Dr. LaTrice Monroe?

Nicole Ari Parker: She is a therapist in San Francisco in private practice. She breaks up with her long-term boyfriend, and reconsiders the direction of her life. She drives into her old neighborhood in Oakland, and decides to open up a practice in Oakland, meeting a coterie of characters that change her life in unexpected ways.

FR: What appealed to you about this character?

Nicole Ari Parker: Kim wrote this character with a keen sense of where a lot of professional women are in their lives. They have sacrificed so much to get ahead and now they are at a crossroad. And it is right in this moment of that success that these women are looking for a deeper connection. And that crossroad is what appealed to me about the LaTrice Monroe character, because she is at that critical moment in her life.

                                                  “Headshop’ set images courtesy of Kim Bass

FR: There are some gentrification storylines in the film. How does your character relate and play that out in the film?

Nicole Ari Parker: Kim layers a whole lot of themes that are affecting communities right now in real time in this film. Things that are going on with small business owners; issues around gentrification; misconceptions of cultures, all these things are packed into this sweet film.

FR: Now you worked with Michael Jai White in ”Black Dynamite,” and Kimberly Elise in the “Loretta Claiborne Story” what was it like working with both again?

Nicole Ari Parker: This was my third time working with Kimberly Elise and it was awesome working with some of my former co-stars again. Come on, I am working with Marla Gibbs and Loretta Devine, what couldn’t be better than that?

It was a real pleasure. I also worked with Evan Ross, Deon Cole from “Blackish,” it was good times on the set. Kimberly and I laughed so hard and had so much fun.

FR: What was the shooting schedule like, and how long did it take to shoot the film?

Nicole Ari Parker: We shot the entire film in under a month with really long hours and a six-day schedule. We shot mostly in San Francisco with exterior shots done in Oakland.

FR: Fashion Reverie is an online fashion magazine, so our viewers would like to know, who are your favorite designers?

Nicole Ari Parker: I love Byron Lars and CD Greene.

FR: Which designers would you like to wear that you haven’t worn, yet?

Nicole Ari Parker: I love Monique Lhuillier, Oscar de la Renta who I’ve worn before, but I would like to keep wearing him. I also would love to wear Michelle Blanchard. I have a real eclectic taste, so I am open to a lot of designers.

                                                     Image courtesy of people.com

FR: What’s next for you? 

Nicole Ari Parker: I have a movie out on TV One with my husband Boris Kodjoe called “Dowsized” about a couple that had a baby when they were still teenagers and now they are in their early 40s, and everything is different. I just wrapped filming a thriller with Forrest Whitaker. And I am just very busy and happy with my life.

—William S. Gooch

 

The Bold Truth of “The Bold Type”

Image courtesy of rubensramblings.com

“The Bold Type” cast image courtesy of rubensramblings.com

When Fashion Reverie heard about a new fashion-based series, “The Bold Type” on Freeform (formerly ABC Family) expectations were low. Based on the description, an exciting drama set in a fashion magazine following the adventures of three women in their late 20’s, Fashion Reverie’s first thought was a “Sex and the City”/”Devil Wears Prada” rip-off with a dash of “Pretty Little Liars” thrown in to brew up a flavorless tea. That “The Bold Type” was debuting during the summer season, a time when so many networks burn off their rejects, didn’t help our opinions.

Depictions of the fashion world in popular culture has always been problematic and a thin veil for aimlessness. From Mallory Keaton on “Family Ties” on NBC in the 80’s to the current portrayal of Hailey Pritchett on ABC’s “Modern Family,” an interest in fashion has been shorthand for being shallow and dumb.

Well, Fashion Reverie is pleased, if a little shocked, to report “The Bold Type” bucks the trend of fashion magazine’s airheaded, but fashionable staffers, depicting an honest, if exaggerated, version of the halls of the fictional Scarlet Magazine. (It’s about time!!)

Image courtesy of thehollywoodreporter.com

Image courtesy of thehollywoodreporter.com

ABC’s “Ugly Betty” showed us the inner workings of Mode Magazine, except the staffers never really worked, did they? There were frequent staff meetings, but it seemed like no work was ever done. In its pilot episode “The Bold Type” shows a fashion magazine presenting its August issue to the board of directors—all major fashion magazines answer to a board of directors that represents the investors interests—who question aspects of articles and ask about advertising.

Yes, the editorial staff of Scarlet Magazine writes articles, and does other things that are critical to a magazine’s success. The show even takes the time to depict the articles as something that WOULD appear in Marie Claire or ELLE.

Melora Hardin image courtesy of freeform.com

Melora Hardin image courtesy of freeform.com

The “The Bold Type’s” main character, Jane, portrayed by Katie Stevens, has spent years as an intern and assistant before landing a job as a staff writer. Okay, she is absurdly young to be a staff writer; however, her portrayal feels authentic. Asked to come up with ten ideas for her first day, an overly excited Jane comes up with 20 only to be crushed when succinctly told by Editor-in-Chief Jacqueline (played by Melora Hardin), “These aren’t working for me, what else do you have?”

The “The Devil Wears Prada” may have been a big hit commercially but among some actual fashion industry professionals, it was reviled. Not only did it illustrate a view that working for a fashion magazine despite being exhausting never seemed to involve any writing or editorial work, but “The Devil Wears Prada” writer Lauren Weisburger never attempted to disguised main character’s Andie Sach’s contempt for fashion. Weisburger’s doppelganger Andie Sachs took pains to remind us that working for a fashion magazine was beneath her. While stories about Anna Wintour’s legendary diva status abound, there can be not debate she turned American Vogue around at time when it desperately needed an overhaul (whether or not American Vogue needs an overhaul now … is another matter), Wintour is well-educated, insanely smart, financially savvy, and dead serious about her job. (Any editor-in-chief whose magazine has subscribers numbering the millions, HAS to be or they will be replaced in minutes.)

It would have been very easy (and more than a bit misogynist) to show Jacqueline as a dragon lady, bitterly jealous of her younger counterparts and treating them with cruelty as a result. “The Bold Type” executive producer Joanna Coles, former editor-in-chief of ELLE and current Chief Content Officer for Hearst Magazines, refused to let this cliché stand.   In order to spearhead a global and extraordinarily influential media operation effectively, an editor-in-chief must work with her staff to get the best from them, challenging them to push themselves beyond their comfort zones.

Image courtesy of thebusinessinsider.com

Image courtesy of thebusinessinsider.com

That said; “The Bold Type” is television so there are some uneven elements. Would a busy editor-in-chief really have so much time to mentor people just one step above entry level? How does the show’s unpaid staffer afford the high-end designer clothes they wear? What do characters Jane and Sutton’s afford their palatial Brooklyn apartment with a GIANT living room? (Are they trust-fund kids, with rich parents helping out?)

Still, none of these uneven elements detracts from the main takeaway of “The Bold Type” which is that fashion journalism can be a difficult and exhausting, but also a fun and important job.  At a time when Teen Vogue is featuring excellent political coverage aimed at young people, the level of empowerment cannot be understated.

And as Scarlet Magazine would argue, if you can change the world wearing a killer pair of heels that only makes your victory that much sweeter. “The Bold Type” airs on ABC’s Freeform channel on Tuesday nights at 9pm.

—Cameron Grey Rose

Misty Copeland Dances “Don Quixote” Her Way

 

Image courtesy of Rosalie O'Connor/ABT

Jeffrey Cirio and Misty Copeland in ABT’s “Don Quixote.” Image courtesy of Rosalie O’Connor/ABT

The sign of a world-class ballerina is when that ballerina puts her individual stamp on a classic role. Misty Copeland did just that in her debut as Kitri in American Ballet Theatre’s (ABT) Don Quixote.

Traditionally, ballerinas who have excelled as Kitri play up the athletic, kittenish, soubrette quality of the character. After all, Kitri is the spicy daughter of inn keeper Lorenzo, who lustily flirts with every man on the stage with her true affections projected toward Basilio, the barber. Also, Don Quixote is set in Seville, Spain. You cannot get any spicier than that.

The list goes on almost ad nauseam of iconic Kitris that have brought a lot of sass and vitality to the role (Ekaterina Maximova, Maya Plisetskaya, Cynthia Harvey, Sylvie Guillem, Lauren Anderson, Nina Ananiashvili, and Paloma Herrera, just to name a few. Gelsey Kirkland who originated the role in ABT’s full-length production was fiery, but she simmered instead of exploding.)

Misty_Copeland-rehearsing_Don_Q

Misty Copeland rising “Don Quixote”

Misty Copeland is a different kind of Kitri. Yes, she she does pepper the role with joie de vivre and punctuated battements and winks. Still, her Kitri is more layered and superbly acted. With Misty’s interpretation, audiences can actually rout for the two main characters—Kitri and Basilio—instead of waiting for fiery variations and multiple pirouettes.It would been a bonus if Copeland’s temps de fleche had more pop, and some of her jumps had more elevation. However,Copeland made up for the slight downgrade in pyrotechnics with her well-thought out portrayal of Kitri. Copeland’s Kiti was earthy, yet determined, full-bodied and contemporary, but still technically pure. (In a recent New York Times article, Copeland talked about working with an acting coach on her debuts this season in ABT’s Don Quixote and Giselle.)

Where Copeland really shined was in the Second Act “Dream” sequence. Her dreamlike Dulcinea was the epitome of the ethereal, grand ballerina, in the mold of Russian Imperial ballerinas, without the mannerisms. Her balances and hops on pointe were exquisitely executed, and her menage of pique turns were extremely fast, keeping time with the conductor’s tempi.

bb_don_quixote_2_Jeffrey_Cirio

Jeffrey Cirio in Boston Ballet’s “Don Quixote

Copeland has an admirable partner in Jeffrey Cirio. This new partnership holds lots of promise, and Cirio brought many of the pyrotechnical fireworks he acquired while performing Basilio with the Boston Ballet. His Basilio was one balletomanes have come to expect in the mold of great Russian dancers—Vasiliev, Nureyev, Baryshnikov, Ruzimatov, and Mukhamedov. Other great performances came from Calvin Royall III’s intense and passionate Espada; Luciana Paris’ fiery Mercedes; Veronika Part’s pristine Queen of the Dryads; Cassandra Trenary’s fleet-footed Amour; Jonathan Klein’s airborne gypsy; and Catherine Hurlin’s very musical flower girl.

Still the star of the evening was Misty Copeland, and in this very auspicious debut, Copeland proves once again that she is a prima ballerina. Fashion Reverie cannot wait for her Giselle debut.

—William S. Gooch

 

 

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